Ankle Fracture

ankle-fracture

Overview

The ankle joint is made up of three bones: the shinbone (tibia), the lower leg bone (fibula), and the ankle bone (talus). One or more of these bones can break when excessive stress, twisting, or trauma is placed on the ankle joint. Because a severe ankle sprain can feel the same as a broken ankle, a physician should access every ankle injury. Immediate treatment typically includes a splint to immobilize the ankle. A short leg cast is then applied. If the fracture is out of place or if the ankle is unstable, surgery may be recommended. Rehabilitation is very important regardless of how an ankle fracture is treated.

Risks
  • Slippery or cluttered floor/ground
  • Falling from height
  • Certain sports/use of faulty sports equipment
  • Being overweight
  • Certain conditions such as osteoporosis or neuropathy
Treatment

Immediate treatment typically includes a splint to immobilize the ankle. After that a cast may be applied. If the fracture is out of place or if the ankle is unstable, surgery may be recommended. Rehabilitation is very important regardless of how an ankle fracture is treated. Rehabilitation includes:

  • Therapeutic soft tissue techniques
  • Therapeutic strapping and bracing
  • Therapeutic exercises (strengthening, stretching, balance and proprioception)
  • Range of motion exercises
  • Gradual return to sport/activity rehabilitation